Back to Basics Track Announced

We are adding a new track to the seven existing tracks that make CppCon the largest C++ conference ever held, every year.

This new track, dubbed the Back to Basics Track, boasts some of today’s top tech trainers. These teachers commit themselves to coming up with classes that make the complicated clear and put the power and performance potential of C++ within the purview of every programmer.

This year the conference received a significantly larger number of session proposals, we’ve moved to a much larger facility, and we set a record for growth in Early Bird registrations, so we felt an increase in content in order.

Attendees want to hear what the standard committee is doing and the conference has always had more than its share of ISO C++ Committee members presenting new library and language features. But attendees also want learn about the tried-and-true and industry best practices.  We set out to create a series of sessions dedicated to:

What every C++ programmer should know about…

We think this is important enough that we are giving this track its own Opening and Closing Keynote addresses by some of our most popular presenters. This year the track features:

Jason Turner The Best Parts of C++ (Opening Keynote)
Klaus Iglberger Back to Basics: Move Semantics (2 parts)
Dan Saks Back to Basics: Const as a Promise
Arthur O’Dwyer Back to Basics: RAII and the Rule of Zero
Rainer Grimm Back to Basics: Atomics, Locks, and Tasks (2 parts)
Jon Kalb Back to Basics: Object-Oriented Programming
Fedor Pikus Back to Basics: Test-Driven Development
Ben Saks Back to Basics: Understanding Value Categories
Dan Saks Back to Basics: Function and Class Templates
Arthur O’Dwyer Back to Basics: Smart Pointers
Inbal Levi Back to Basics: Virtual Dispatch and Its Alternatives
Ben Saks Back to Basics: Exception Handling and Exception Safety
Arthur O’Dwyer Back to Basics: Lambdas from Scratch
Arthur O’Dwyer Back to Basics: Type Erasure
Chandler Carruth & Titus Winters What is C++ (Closing Keynote)
Chandler Carruth Titus Winters

 

Many thanks to Arthur O’Dwyer, Back to Basic Track Chair.

Khronos Group to Sponsor Quiet Rooms at CppCon 2019

Khronos Group Quiet Room Sponsorship

Khronos GroupWe are happy to announce the Khronos Group Quiet Room Sponsorship. The Khronos Group is making it possible for us to provide not one, but two one-thousand square foot rooms to provide attendees with the down-time opportunity they need to stay at their best during CppCon 2019.

CppCon is an intense conference

CppCon is so intense that Kate Gregory wrote about it in her 2015 blog post, Surviving an intense conference. This was from the second year of the conference’s existence. The conference has only gotten more intense in the last four years, making the advise she gives even more valuable.

CppCon has five days (nine if you include classes) full of content from 08:00 to 22:00. An event-filled week made up of very long days.

There are twenty classes, a field trip, over seven tracks of breakout sessions, daily plenary talks, BoFs, Open Content sessions, dinners, author signings, a poster competition, podcasts recorded onsite, the conference-swag shop, exhibitors, panels, a bookstore, a day-long ISO C++ Study Group meeting, lightning talks, and a Tool Time session.

All this, but the most important part is, there are over a thousand attendees, including over a hundred speakers, who you want to meet and who want to engage with you.

No one can do it all.

Taking care of you

You’ll get the most out of the conference if you are at your best and staying at your best means getting the quiet time you need. Staying at the Gaylord Rockies makes it possible, during a single breakout session, to slip back to your room, catch a cat nap, and return refreshed for the next session.

Khronos Quiet Rooms

An even nearer and quicker option are the Khronos Quiet Rooms, which will be the perfect place for you to recharge yourself and your devices while reading email, editing slides, fixing bugs, or just relaxing between events. They are not for conversations, either in person or on the phone, nor for listening to anything without headphones, because we want to make certain they are relaxing for other attendees as well.

CppCon 2019 Call for Poster Submissions

Are you doing something cool with C++? Got a great new library, technique, or tool?

We want you to share it with the C++ community by creating a poster and presenting it at CppCon 2019!

The poster submissions deadline is July 29th, with decisions sent by August 6th. For topic ideas, submission instructions, and advice on making the best possible submission, see the 2019 Poster Submissions page.

 

Early Bird Registration Ends Monday

No matter when you register for CppCon 2019, you be able to :

  • Meet with
    • over a thousand other professional C++ engineers, including
      • book, blog, and library authors,
      • standards committee members,
      • compiler and other tool implementers, and
      • teachers and trainers
    • scores of the best presenters in the industry, and
    • exhibitors from all over the world
  • Attend
    • five days of seven or eight tracks of peer-reviewed presentations,
    • daily plenary talks from recognized industry leaders (see below),
    • multiple lightning talk sessions,
    • expert panels and special sessions,
    • poster presentations, and
    • social events.

But if you do it by this Monday, you save enough money to treat yourself and a friend to the conference Meet the Speakers banquet.

To help you decide, we are announcing our line up of plenary speakers:

AndreiAlexandrescu

Andrei Alexandrescu

Andrei’s talk will be a deep dive on variants of classic sorting algorithms. You might think that sorting has been studied to death and is a solved problem. But Andrei thinks there is more learn. Along the way he’ll share many wondrous surprises and teach us how to cope with the puzzling behavior of modern complex architectures.

Ben Smith

Ben will use a top-down approach to show how WebAssembly can solve a real-world problem.

His challenge is to build a Compiler Explorer-like tool that doesn’t require a server. He will show how to compile C++ code in the browser and run the resulting executable sandboxed in the browser.

Ben Smith
Bjarne Stroustrup

Bjarne Stroustrup

C++ is turning forty. In a talk that both looks back and looks forward, Bjarne will ask the question, What is C++?

He will answer by looking at C++20, as a modern language, not treating it as a layer cake of features, but as integrated whole discussing how classes, templates, lambdas, and the other components of the language fit together.

Herb Sutter

Herb is going to discuss exceptions and RTTI, the only two features in C++ that violate the the zero-overhead principle. These features have divided our community. This talk is about ongoing long-term efforts to try to unify the community, not by replacing exceptions and RTTI, but by doubling down: fully embracing exceptions and RTTI, and improving them so they can be zero-overhead too.

Herb Sutter
Sean Parent

Sean Parent

Computer scientists are bad at relationships. Nearly every program crash is rooted in a mismanaged relationship, yet we spend most of our time discussing types and functions and not the relationships connecting them together. Sean’s talk looks at common ways data and code are connected in an application, how those relationships are typically represented, and the problems caused by the use, and misuse of these paradigms.

These five speakers will be joined by over one hundred of the best presenters in the industry as well as over a thousand top C++ programmers that want to engage with you, sharing their insight and experience. Do not miss the chance to join them all in Aurora this September.

Don’t delay, register today.

Call for Volunteers and Volunteer Grant Program

Volunteering at CppCon

If you would like to attend CppCon 2019, see great C++ content, and meet our speakers and attendees, but conference registration doesn’t fit your budget, consider volunteering.

Ambience_and_snacks_6

We are looking for volunteers to help run the conference. We need people to:

  • help assemble registration packets and badges,
  • register attendees,
  • assist speakers with Audio/Video (AV),
  • and, in general, be on hand to make things run smoothly.

In exchange, we’ll see to it that you’ll spend at least half of your time in sessions. It would be great if you could join us for the whole week, but if you can only make it for one or two days, we can work with that. We have information on our Volunteer Page. If you would like more information, please email volunteers@cppcon.org.

Volunteer Grant Program

This program has grants to cover some or (in a few cases) all of the costs of lodging and travel for a limited number of volunteers. Grants will be awarded to applicants that can commit to volunteering for five days. Grant applications will be accepted until June 25th and judged on the basis of participation and leadership in the C++ community.

If you:

  • are active in the C++ community on-line, in your local user group, or at C++ events,
  • are actively supporting C++ on StackOverflow or GitHub,
  • have worked on an Open Source C++ project like an Open Source library, CppReference, C++VAP,
  • write reviews for Open Source libraries on Boost, Boost Incubator, or C++ Reviews,
  • or, have a blog, podcast, or YouTube channel on C++,

but have not attended CppCon because you can’t afford the travel and lodging, this is your opportunity.

For more information about the Volunteer Grant Program, read our Volunteer Page.

Casa Bonita / Hyperspace Arcade Field Trip Announced

Casa BonitaJoin us for fun and games in Denver!

The CppCon 2019 Field Trip will be to Casa Bonita and Hyperspace Arcade.

Spend a fun-filled Sunday afternoon on September 15th, with other CppCon attendees, at the world famous Casa Bonita restaurant for lunch and then free 80’s style arcade games all afternoon at the nearby Hyperspace Arcade.

Casa Bonita is the Mexican restaurant made famous by the South Park episode in which the boys declare that it’s like the Disneyland of Mexican restaurants. The restaurant features a number of different entertainments, such as cliff divers, shows, and a secret hideout.

Hyperspace Arcade features unlimited game play on over one hundred fifty machines including classics and rare titles.

If you are arriving for CppCon 2019 by Sunday morning, this is your opportunity get to know some of your fellow attendees in a fun-filled stress-free environments.

See  the CppCon 2019 Field Trip page for details.

Engage, Entertain, Educate: Technical Speaking that Works

AndreiAlexandrescu

John Lakos

Attendees at last year’s Engage, Entertain, Educate (EEE) workshop wrote to us: “Please rehire!” “Please repeat!” and “You should have this class every year.”

Well, we can’t promise every year, but we are are bringing it back this year as a one-day pre-conference workshop.

This workshop is presented by three of the most widely recognized presenters in the C++ community: Andrei Alexandrescu, John Lakos, and Kate Gregory.

Kate Gregory

The workshop will combine some lecture (“I like the opening by Andrei, it highlights things we need to look [at in] our talk”) with actual presentation practice (“the breakout where we have to simulate the actual talk was really useful!”).

EEE 2018 PresentationWhether you are planning to speak at a conference, a local user group, or at your own company, this workshop will help you build the skills and confidence that are key to being a successful technical presenter.

This year we are lowering the class size limit which allows more time for attention from each instructor, but does mean that the class will fill sooner. Don’t miss this opportunity to get individual attention and coaching from some of the best presenters in our community.

Register for this workshop and all the rest of this year’s classes on our Registration Page.

CppCon 2019 Call for Submissions

CppCon is the annual, week-long face-to-face gathering for the entire C++ community. The conference is organized by the C++ community for the community and so we invite you to present. The conference regular program consists of five days of seven tracks of one hour sessions.

Have you learned something interesting about C++, maybe a new technique possible in C++14/17/20? Or perhaps you have implemented something cool related to C++, maybe a new C++ library? If so, consider sharing it with other C++ enthusiasts by giving a regular program talk at CppCon 2019.

The submissions deadline is May 20 with decisions sent by July 8.

For topic ideas, possible formats, submission instructions and valuable advice on how to make the best possible submission, see the Submissions page.

Note: Calls for lightning talks and Open Content sessions will be made this summer. The deadline for these is the conference itself.

Registration for CppCon 2019 is Open

Registration is now open for CppCon 2019 to be held September 15-20, 2019 at the Gaylord Rockies in Aurora, Colorado, USA.

CppCon is the annual, week-long face-to-face gathering for the entire C++ community. The conference is organized by the C++ community for the community. You will enjoy inspirational talks and a friendly atmosphere designed to help attendees learn from each other, meet interesting people, and generally have a stimulating experience.

This year, the conference is taking place at our new home at the Gaylord Rockies Hotel and Convention Center in Aurora, Colorado, very near Denver International Airport. The venue is brand new and we’ll have lots more space, but we’ll still have all the events which you’ve come to know and love, including multiple diverse tracks. The conference will appeal to anyone from C++ novices to experts.

2018 attendees

What you can expect at CppCon:

Scott at the Bookstore

  • Invited talks and panels: Expect a week full of insight from some of the world’s leading experts in C++. Still have questions? Ask them at one of CppCon’s panels featuring those at the cutting edge of the language, such as the Grill the Committee panel, where you’ll be able to ask questions of ISO Standard C++ Committee members.
  • Presentations by the C++ community: What do embedded systems, game development, high frequency trading, motion picture graphics, the defense and aerospace industries, and particle accelerators have in common? C++, of course! Expect talks from a broad range of domain experts focused on practical C++ techniques, libraries, and tools.
  • Lightning talks: Get informed at a fast pace during special sessions of short, less formal talks. Never presented at a conference before? This is your chance to share your thoughts on a C++-related topic in an informal setting.
  • Poster Competition: Enjoy the insights on display and vote on your favorite posters. Or share your insights and enjoy competing.
  • Exhibitors and Tool time: Have a question or interest about a particular tool? Have one-on-one conversations with tool experts.
  • Field Trip: This year’s trip is to world famous Casa Bonita Mexican restaurant and to an “all you can eat” video arcade.
  • Student Program: We support full-time students with special registration, content, and social activities.
  • Evening events, dinners, and “un-conference” time: Relax, socialize with speakers and other attendees, or start an impromptu coding session.

Meet the Speakers Banquet 2018

CppCon’s goal is to encourage the best use of C++ while preserving the diversity of viewpoints and experiences. The conference is a project of the Standard C++ Foundation, a not-for-profit organization whose purpose is to support the C++ software developer community and promote the understanding and use of modern, standard C++ on all compilers and platforms.

New Venue Report

The grand opening of the Gaylord Rockies, CppCon’s new home as of this year, was held this past weekend and they invited Gaylord Rockiesyour Conference Chair (that would be me) and the team from our event management partners, Krueger Event Management  (that would be Mike and Karen Krueger), along with five hundred other event planners to spend the weekend. This gave the team at the GR (yes, that’s what we call it) a chance to show off the brand new convention center and what they can do with everything from food and beverage to decorating and AV.

The team at our previous home, the Meydenbauer Center in Bellevue, was great and we don’t expect to ever find a better team, but from what we’ve seen so far, we may have found a team that can match them.

Gaylord convention centers are known for their inspiring atriums and impressive public spaces and the Rockies lives up that reputation. The main atrium is designed in a mountain lodge style with a view that overlooks downtown Denver and the Rockies beyond. This is the center of the public space and is large enough to feature design elements like enormous (faux) boulders and a historic nineteenth century railroad caboose on a train track that goes over a bridge crossing a water feature fed by the indoor waterfall.

Gaylord Rockies Atrium

This area has plenty of casual seating and also dining tables served by “ski village” food and drink bars. It also connects the three main restaurants (one Asian, one Italian, and a steakhouse) and the sports bar, which seats five hundred and features the largest video screen in Colorado. Well, the largest indoor screen. Apparently, the one at the Bronco’s stadium is bigger.

All of the venue is spacious, modern, and filled with Colorado/Rockies inspired art and decor.

To the left of the atrium, as you enter, is the spa, a huge fitness center, and an Gaylord Rockies Indoor Poolindoor/outdoor pool area that features a couple of water slides, one five-stories high, as well as a mile-long “lazy river.” I didn’t pack a swim suit, but I regretted it as soon as we stepped into the pool area. Even for an old guy like me, it looks like a lot of fun. Don’t forget your suit.

To the right of the atrium, is a store for souvenirs and the kinds of things that business travelers sometimes forget to bring and a “grab and go” market with snacks and things like salads and sandwiches. Beyond these is the corridor leading to the convention center which features a Starbucks and the largest FedEx/Kinkos in Colorado.

In our search for a new venue, we weren’t looking for luxury. We were looking for a home that would best accommodate our size and growth (and had good dates available). The Gaylord is a bit up-scale, but the space we are getting is so exciting that we knew it was the best match for our requirements.

We’ll have enough space to seat everyone in one room for plenary sessions (without resorting to an overflow room) for the foreseeable future. We’ll have enough breakout spaces that we can run the seven tracks that we have now and expand in the future with a possible academic track or other options. We’ll have the space to host the standard committee’s Low Latency and Game Developer Study Group (and perhaps other groups) under the same roof.

I don’t want to make a public commitment to anything that isn’t completely locked yet, but just as an example of what we can do with extra meeting space, we are working on a “quiet room.” This is a space with no conversation or phone calls, but with seating and power for charging stations and to work on slides or email. Or to just spend a few minutes of downtime in the middle of a long day.

As excited as I am about the additional meeting space, I’m even more excited about the ample public space. As we were outgrowing the Meydenbauer, we felt the pain first in the public areas. We use public space for the poster competition, exhibitor tables and booths, breaks and lunch concessions, the bookstore and author signings, public seating and whiteboards, registration and the information desk, and charging stations as well as its most important purpose, getting to sessions and talking with other attendees. This won’t be an issue at the GR convention center. As we were walking through the space this weekend, my comment to Karen and Mike was that it was an “embarrassment” of public space. The challenge for us as planners will be to make the best use of it. Not having enough public space won’t be an issue.

One of our top criteria for selecting a venue was finding a place where all attendees could be “under one roof.” Although our previous home at the Meydenbauer Center was a great experience, we weren’t happy about having attendees in half a dozen hotels scattered across Bellevue. We feel that the conference experience will be enhanced by having everyone staying together.

Jon and bear

Jon makes a new friend

Rooming at the GR will mean more opportunities to meet with other attendees and it will also make attending the conference less stressful. CppCon is packed with content which makes for a long, exhausting week (to nine days with classes). As Kate Gregory suggests, taking an afternoon nap may be a key survival technique. Knowing that your room is just an elevator ride away means you can get a cat nap in while missing only one session. It is also comforting to know that you don’t need to leave the building after attending a lightning talk session that ends at 10pm.

The GR has relaxation/stress reduction options. I personally tested out the spa (the sacrifices I make…) and I can’t think of a better way to relax and reinvigorate during the conference. A few minutes in the pool area would be a close second and that would be free. Did I mention that you should bring your swim suit?

I’m so excited about our new home that I vacillate between wishing it were September already and being overwhelmed with the work ahead of us in the next half year.

A key component of our preparation plan is involving local C++ programmers as much as possible. We are working with the North Denver Metro C++ Meetup group (thank you Jason and Scott), who are excited for us to make our new home near them. They are helping in several ways including working on the field trip (which we teased at the close of last year’s conference) and finding local partners such as an event/portrait photographer and a bookstore we can work with for books sales and author signings.

Gaylord Rockies Atrium with windowThis last weekend’s trip was very valuable to Karen, Mike, and me because it was our first chance to see the GR, to meet members of the their team, and see them in action. Because it was their grand opening, while we asked a lot of questions, it wasn’t an opportunity for us to sit down with the team and do any serious planning. We’ve set up another visit when we’ll have the team’s undivided attention and can really sit down, roll up our sleeves, and plan for the best use of this marvelous space.

That meeting will be later this month. Karen and I will return and in addition to the GR team, we’ll be joined by Herb Sutter, President of the Standard C++ Foundation, the organization that is ultimately responsible for CppCon. During this trip we’ll also be meeting with local members of the planning committee, who will get their chance to tour the space.

The GR is hosting a special meeting of the local C++ meetup on March 14th at the GR which will feature a talk by Herb. If you are anywhere near Denver, don’t miss this opportunity to hear Herb’s talk and to get a taste of the new home for CppCon.

I’ll see you all in Aurora in September!