Registration for CppCon 2020 is Open

2020 has a been a challenging year for all of us. As C++ programmers with in-demand skills and, for most of us, the ability to work from home, we are better off than many, but it hasn’t been easy for any of us.

Most of us value the experience of having casual conversations with smart, knowledgeable C++ programmers, particularly when a new version of Standard C++ is out. In a year in which these opportunities have been severely reduced by a combination of working at home and the cancellation of in-person events such as conferences and user group meetings, we appreciate the in-person experience all the more. CppCon, one of the best C++ in-person experiences of the year, is needed this year more than ever and we are excited to be bringing it to you.

Vanderbilt University Medical CenterOf course, we can only do this if it is safe to do so. We are monitoring the situation closely and will hold the event only if it is safe to do so and only in a manner that is safe. We are working very closely with our venue, the Gaylord Rockies, in planning the event. They have selected Vanderbilt University Medical Center as their Wellness Advisor and have published their Health and Safety Cleanliness Standards.

We still have a lot of details to work out, but we know that this year’s conference will be very different than a “normal” CppCon. We’ll still have the most important aspects, a lot of great content (including a new Embedded Track joining our Back to Basic Track), great classes, and opportunities for you to meet and engage with some of the most knowledgable and articulate developers in the C++ world. We are planning on having much more personal space during and between sessions. Although there will be plenty of opportunities for engaging with other attendees, these will be in informal small-group settings. Large social events, such as the Meet the Speakers Banquet, that we’ve had in previous conferences will, no doubt, return in future years.

Because we must cap our attendance (we don’t yet have an exact number, we are still working that out), we are looking at the possibility, for the first time with CppCon, of selling out the conference. If you’d like to attend, register as soon as possible. You may be concerned about registering and then discovering that you can’t attend. This is understandable, so we are offering a no-questions-asked, complete refund until thirty days before the conference, August 14th. (At that point, we need to make certain financial commitments to our vendors, but if you need to cancel after that, we’ll apply your 2020 fee to provide a free registration for CppCon 2021.)

CppCon 2020 will be an exciting and memorable event in a difficult year, but I’m looking forward to what we are planning and hope that you are as well. I understand that many CppCon regulars will not be able to attend, but if can join us, please register to hold your spot and plan to take part in great discussions about best practices, new ideas and techniques, and C++20.

Jon Kalb
Conference Chair

CppCon 2020 Call for Submissions

CppCon is the annual, week-long face-to-face gathering for the entire C++ community. The conference is organized by the C++ community for the community and so we invite you to present. The conference regular program consists of five days of sixty minute sessions.

Given the current situation regarding COVID-19, we feel it is best to be totally transparent with our planning process. We are closely monitoring the news regarding restrictions on travel and large gatherings. It takes about 9-12 months of planning for each conference and given that we do not know the situation in September, we are moving forward with the hope that it will be safe to see you all in Aurora.

Have you learned something interesting about C++, maybe a new technique possible in C++14/17/20? Or perhaps you have implemented something cool related to C++, maybe a new C++ library? If so, consider sharing it with other C++ enthusiasts by giving a regular program talk at CppCon 2020.

The submissions deadline is June 5th with decisions sent by July 13th.

We’ve made a format change to better serve the needs of our community. In addition to the dedicated track that we introduced last year (the Back to Basics Track), we’ve created another dedicated track (the Embedded Track).

For topic ideas, possible formats, submission instructions and valuable advice on how to make the best possible submission, see the Submissions page.

Note: Calls for Lightning Talks and Open Content sessions will be made this summer. The deadline for these is the conference itself.

Milestone | New Home | Trip Reports

A milestone

CppCon 2019 was the first year in our new home at the Gaylord Rockies in Aurora, Colorado.

Long before I’d ever done it, I told people that I thought that moving a conference is almost as much work as starting one from scratch. Now that I have moved a conference, I’ve learned that started a conference from scratch is actually easier than moving that conference after it has been growing in one location for five years.

We asked a lot of the team of volunteers and professionals that make up our staff and the Aqua Army to make this move possible and our team came through in a big way.

As we expected there were first-year-at-a-new-location issues, but also as we expected, attendees were delighted by the new venue and I think we are all excited by the possibilities that we see for our conferences in coming years.

A new home

The first of the these conferences will be CppCon 2020 at the Gaylord Rockies during the week of September 13th, 2020.

Building on the success of this year’s pre and post-conference classes, we will be offering classes on September 12th-13th and 19th-20th. The CppCon 2020 Registration Reception will be on the evening of the 13th and sessions will be the 14th though the 18th.

One feature that met with great approval was the opportunity to have the hotel and conference center under one roof. But we did underestimate the demand for rooms in the GR (as we call it).

As we look forward to next year, we’ve requested more rooms, but we’ve already been told that we won’t be able to get all that we’d like. Other groups that will be at the GR during out dates have also asked for more rooms.

We are committed to finding suitable overflow venues and transportation for all of next year’s attendees, but if you are interested in enjoying the “under one roof” feature of staying at the GR, then you’ll need to reserve your rooms early.

Content

In the meantime, look for slides and source code for your favorite CppCon 2019 sessions at our presentation material repository. That is were you’ll also find the posters that were entered in the CppCon 2019 Poster Competition.

You can also watch CppCon 2019 session videos on YouTube. Some of them are already available on the CppCon YouTube channel in the CppCon 2019 playlist.

Thanks and trip reports

I want to say thanks very much to all the hundreds of people that made CppCon 2019 possible and, in particular, I want to thank those that have published trip reports:

CppCon 2019 Trip Report by Leslie Lai

CppCon 2019 Trip Report by Matt Godbolt

Cppcon 2019 Trip Report by Geoffrey Viola

CppCon 2019 Trip Report and Slides by Anthony Williams

CppCon 2019 trip report by Stephan Dollberg

CPPCON 2019 Trip Report by Jan Wilmans

À propos de cppcon 2019 by Patrice Roy (in French)

NDC TechTown and CppCon trip report by Martin Hořeňovský

CppCon 2019 Trip Report by Alan Shen

 

Podcasts:

CppCast: Provable Functions at CppCon 2019 by Jason Turner and Rob Irving (w/ Lisa Lippincott)

CppCast: Visual C++ Announcements at CppCon 2019 by Jason Turner and Rob Irving (w/ Marian Luparu, Stephan T Lavavej, and Sy Brand)

Take Up Code #257: CppCon: Interview With Sean Hale About Becoming A Software Developer Without A Degree In Computer Science by Wahid Tanner

Take Up Code #258: CppCon: Interview With Nicolai Josuttis About How The C++ Standardization Has Changed Over The Years by Wahid Tanner

Take Up Code #259: CppCon: Interview With Asad Naweed About Augmented Reality by Wahid Tanner

Take Up Code #260: CppCon: Interview With Josh Lospinoso About The Book C++ Crash Course by Wahid Tanner

Take Up Code #261: CppCon: Interview With Conor Hoekstra About C++ Algorithms And Ranges by Wahid Tanner

If you know of any trip reports I’ve missed, please let me know. I plan to update this post with new trip reports as I learn about about them.

look forward to seeing you in Aurora next September.

Tool Time 2019

Tool Time is Back!

Similar to tech labs at some other events, we’re offering the opportunity for anyone, from an author/creator, to a vendor, to a super-user, to represent a tool (app, library, framework, or service) and run their own table answering questions or showing demos.

This is an opportunity to both share and learn about the tools that make professional C++ development possible. We’ll have a ninety-minute session on Tuesday evening that is open to anyone that wants to talk tools.

Participation is free and we are currently accepting applications for tables.

See the Tool Time page for more details and to make your submission.

Presenter Interviews: Emery Berger

In this week’s presenter interview, Kevin talks with Professor Emery Berger about his time working with memory management in C++, what he is looking forward to at this years conference, and his session Mesh: Automatically Compacting Your C++ Application’s Memory.

Come back next week for another CppCon 2019 presenter interview.

Presenter Interviews: Matthew Butler

In this week’s presenter interview, Kevin chats with Matthew Butler today about his upcoming class at CppCon, Exploiting Modern C++: Building Highly-Dependable Software, his first WG21 meeting in Cologne, and his upcoming CppCon talk If You Can’t Open It, You Don’t Own It.

Stop by again next week for another CppCon 2019 presenter interview.

Lightning Talks and Lightning Challenge

Whilst many of the main conference talks go deep, Lightning Talks are, well, lighter. That doesn’t mean you won’t gain deep insights from some. Many, however, are humorous, entertaining – and often high-energy!

They can also be a great opportunity for newer speakers to break in to speaking at the CppCon venue.

So if you have something to share that the C++ community might enjoy, and you think you can fit it into a five-minute package, post your submission here

Note that the lightning talk sessions are open to anyone, regardless of whether they have a conference ticket – even if you want to speak!

Lightning Challenge

If you’re looking to level up, and want a chance to speak for more than five-minutes, perhaps you’re up for the Lightning Challenge?

The catch is it’s up to the audience (using “modern technology”) whether you get the full eight minutes, or get cut off at four!

Sign up at the same place for this gamified format or come and observe the antics as the presenters try to win you over for more time.

Whether presenting or being entertained, get ready for the always entertaining Lightning Talks on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday night. See you all there!.

For more details on submissions, see The Lightning Talks Submissions page

Presenter Interviews: Stephan T. Lavavej

In this week’s presenter interview, Kevin Carpenter welcomes Stephan T. Lavavej (STL) for a preview of his upcoming talk, Floating-Point charconv: Making Your Code 10x Faster With C++17’s Final Boss. Stephan discusses achieving a 3x to 10x speed up with charconv in C++17.

Join us again next week for another CppCon 2019 presenter interview.