Call for Open Content Sessions

As we do every year, we offer Open Content session in the early morning, over lunch, and in the evening.

Audience8

Open Content is just that, open! Attendees and regular program speakers alike can propose sessions on anything (related to C++) that interests them. These might feature a single facilitator leading a room through an exercise, activity or demo, a panel of 3-5 people taking questions from the room, a “hackathon” on a specific project, or an open conversation among the whole room. The projector is available for slides or public note taking.

Open Content is designed for flexibility so that a “Birds of a Feather” talk may be proposed even after the conference has begun. A speaker who gets a lot of post-talk questions may agree to host a Q&A session in the Open Content time. An attendee inspired by a session may host a session to explore a topic further or start on a group implementation of something.

Anyone can submit an open content session, you don’t need to be a conference speaker (or even a registered attendee). To submit, visit our Open Content Submissions page.

These sessions will be open in another way too – Open Content does not require conference registration. That’s right, everyone who is in the area is welcome to come and join us for all the early morning/lunch/evening sessions, including proposing or leading a session. This is part of our goal to be an inclusive conference for the entire C++ community.

Free Friday

All CppCon 2019 events on Friday, September 20th, do not require conference registration. That’s right, just like all our evening sessions (except ones involving food–the dinners and reception), all Friday sessions are open to the public without a conference registration. This includes talks by some of our popular speakers.

#include<C++> Sponsorships

#include<C++> is accepting applications for sponsorship to CppCon 2019.

Sponsorships will cover registration, travel, accommodation, and both the Meet the Speakers Banquet and the #include<C++> Celebration Dinner.

Applications are open through August 16th, to any candidate from an under-represented background with regard to the usual CppCon attendees.

The sponsorships are crowdfunded through a GoFundMe campaign that has not quite yet reached its funding goal. Please consider donating to show your support for this sponsorship opportunity.

[Sponsorship Application Form]

[GoFundMe campaign]

 

#include<C++> Celebration Dinner

Join members of #include<C++> for a celebration dinner on the evening of Wednesday, September 18th. Meet other attendees who value inclusion and diversity, and network with some of the most influential members of the C++ community. If you are alone at the conference, be sure to come to the dinner to meet people and feel more connected. If you’re “the only one” from your team come and connect to a larger group and share advice and support.

Kate GregoryAfter a buffet dinner there will be a panel discussion moderated by Kate Gregory, and then there will be more time to strengthen friendships and learn from each other. It will be a special evening – please be part of it!

Note: if cost is an issue for you, please contact #include<C++> to apply for a scholarship to the dinner. Limited numbers are available. If you are able to contribute to the scholarship fund and ensure another attendee is able to benefit from the dinner, they’d love to hear from you, too.

(This option was added to registration late, so attendees that registered early might have missed it. Since it is a stand-alone registration option, just register again selecting only this item.)

You can register here.

Presenter Interviews: Clare Macrae, Eric Niebler, and David Hollman

Over the next few weeks we’re going to bring you some great interviews with CppCon 2019 presenters, conducted by our own Kevin Carpenter.  Each one is a quick look at what you can expect from their talk.

This week we’re pleased to introduce Clare Macrae, with a sneak peak at her talk, Quickly Testing Legacy C++ Code with Approval Tests. Clare describes how Approval Tests can help you get coverage for your legacy code.

Kevin also brings us Eric Niebler and David Hollman discussing their upcoming talk, A Unifying Abstraction for Async in C++.

Join us each Monday for another set of presenter interviews.

CppCon 2019 Program Available

Ben SmithThe program for CppCon 2019 is now live!

We’ll have almost 150 regular sessions delivered by the best C++ presenters in the industry, many returning from previous years as well as some exciting new voices. We’ll have seven or eight concurrent tracks full of sessions containing C++ best practices and what you need to know about C++17 and even what is planned for C++20, including one track devoted to Back to Basics talks.

In addition to the main program, we’ll have panels, lightning talks, Open Content talks, BOFs, author signings, exhibitors, standards committee meetings, community social events, workshops, classes, and some awesome headline speakers.

Most of the program is published, but we are still working a few things, like categorizing talks and a few surprises, so keep checking back.

We’d like to thank the Program Committee, our speakers, and the many professionals who proposed talks which we, unfortunately, just couldn’t squeeze in this year. Thank you for your hard work and enthusiastic support for this year’s program!

If you aren’t certain that you want to join us in Aurora this September, watch the attendee video from last year!

If you recognize someone you know, let them know that you’ll see them in September.

Back to Basics Track Announced

We are adding a new track to the seven existing tracks that make CppCon the largest C++ conference ever held, every year.

This new track, dubbed the Back to Basics Track, boasts some of today’s top tech trainers. These teachers commit themselves to coming up with classes that make the complicated clear and put the power and performance potential of C++ within the purview of every programmer.

This year the conference received a significantly larger number of session proposals, we’ve moved to a much larger facility, and we set a record for growth in Early Bird registrations, so we felt an increase in content in order.

Attendees want to hear what the standard committee is doing and the conference has always had more than its share of ISO C++ Committee members presenting new library and language features. But attendees also want learn about the tried-and-true and industry best practices.  We set out to create a series of sessions dedicated to:

What every C++ programmer should know about…

We think this is important enough that we are giving this track its own Opening and Closing Keynote addresses by some of our most popular presenters. This year the track features:

Jason Turner The Best Parts of C++ (Opening Keynote)
Klaus Iglberger Back to Basics: Move Semantics (2 parts)
Dan Saks Back to Basics: Const as a Promise
Arthur O’Dwyer Back to Basics: RAII and the Rule of Zero
Rainer Grimm Back to Basics: Atomics, Locks, and Tasks (2 parts)
Jon Kalb Back to Basics: Object-Oriented Programming
Fedor Pikus Back to Basics: Test-Driven Development
Ben Saks Back to Basics: Understanding Value Categories
Dan Saks Back to Basics: Function and Class Templates
Arthur O’Dwyer Back to Basics: Smart Pointers
Inbal Levi Back to Basics: Virtual Dispatch and Its Alternatives
Ben Saks Back to Basics: Exception Handling and Exception Safety
Arthur O’Dwyer Back to Basics: Lambdas from Scratch
Arthur O’Dwyer Back to Basics: Type Erasure
Chandler Carruth & Titus Winters What is C++ (Closing Keynote)
Chandler Carruth Titus Winters

 

Many thanks to Arthur O’Dwyer, Back to Basic Track Chair.

Khronos Group to Sponsor Quiet Rooms at CppCon 2019

Khronos Group Quiet Room Sponsorship

Khronos GroupWe are happy to announce the Khronos Group Quiet Room Sponsorship. The Khronos Group is making it possible for us to provide not one, but two one-thousand square foot rooms to provide attendees with the down-time opportunity they need to stay at their best during CppCon 2019.

CppCon is an intense conference

CppCon is so intense that Kate Gregory wrote about it in her 2015 blog post, Surviving an intense conference. This was from the second year of the conference’s existence. The conference has only gotten more intense in the last four years, making the advise she gives even more valuable.

CppCon has five days (nine if you include classes) full of content from 08:00 to 22:00. An event-filled week made up of very long days.

There are twenty classes, a field trip, over seven tracks of breakout sessions, daily plenary talks, BoFs, Open Content sessions, dinners, author signings, a poster competition, podcasts recorded onsite, the conference-swag shop, exhibitors, panels, a bookstore, a day-long ISO C++ Study Group meeting, lightning talks, and a Tool Time session.

All this, but the most important part is, there are over a thousand attendees, including over a hundred speakers, who you want to meet and who want to engage with you.

No one can do it all.

Taking care of you

You’ll get the most out of the conference if you are at your best and staying at your best means getting the quiet time you need. Staying at the Gaylord Rockies makes it possible, during a single breakout session, to slip back to your room, catch a cat nap, and return refreshed for the next session.

Khronos Quiet Rooms

An even nearer and quicker option are the Khronos Quiet Rooms, which will be the perfect place for you to recharge yourself and your devices while reading email, editing slides, fixing bugs, or just relaxing between events. They are not for conversations, either in person or on the phone, nor for listening to anything without headphones, because we want to make certain they are relaxing for other attendees as well.

Early Bird Registration Ends Monday

No matter when you register for CppCon 2019, you be able to :

  • Meet with
    • over a thousand other professional C++ engineers, including
      • book, blog, and library authors,
      • standards committee members,
      • compiler and other tool implementers, and
      • teachers and trainers
    • scores of the best presenters in the industry, and
    • exhibitors from all over the world
  • Attend
    • five days of seven or eight tracks of peer-reviewed presentations,
    • daily plenary talks from recognized industry leaders (see below),
    • multiple lightning talk sessions,
    • expert panels and special sessions,
    • poster presentations, and
    • social events.

But if you do it by this Monday, you save enough money to treat yourself and a friend to the conference Meet the Speakers banquet.

To help you decide, we are announcing our line up of plenary speakers:

AndreiAlexandrescu

Andrei Alexandrescu

Andrei’s talk will be a deep dive on variants of classic sorting algorithms. You might think that sorting has been studied to death and is a solved problem. But Andrei thinks there is more learn. Along the way he’ll share many wondrous surprises and teach us how to cope with the puzzling behavior of modern complex architectures.

Ben Smith

Ben will use a top-down approach to show how WebAssembly can solve a real-world problem.

His challenge is to build a Compiler Explorer-like tool that doesn’t require a server. He will show how to compile C++ code in the browser and run the resulting executable sandboxed in the browser.

Ben Smith
Bjarne Stroustrup

Bjarne Stroustrup

C++ is turning forty. In a talk that both looks back and looks forward, Bjarne will ask the question, What is C++?

He will answer by looking at C++20, as a modern language, not treating it as a layer cake of features, but as integrated whole discussing how classes, templates, lambdas, and the other components of the language fit together.

Herb Sutter

Herb is going to discuss exceptions and RTTI, the only two features in C++ that violate the the zero-overhead principle. These features have divided our community. This talk is about ongoing long-term efforts to try to unify the community, not by replacing exceptions and RTTI, but by doubling down: fully embracing exceptions and RTTI, and improving them so they can be zero-overhead too.

Herb Sutter
Sean Parent

Sean Parent

Computer scientists are bad at relationships. Nearly every program crash is rooted in a mismanaged relationship, yet we spend most of our time discussing types and functions and not the relationships connecting them together. Sean’s talk looks at common ways data and code are connected in an application, how those relationships are typically represented, and the problems caused by the use, and misuse of these paradigms.

These five speakers will be joined by over one hundred of the best presenters in the industry as well as over a thousand top C++ programmers that want to engage with you, sharing their insight and experience. Do not miss the chance to join them all in Aurora this September.

Don’t delay, register today.

Call for Volunteers and Volunteer Grant Program

Volunteering at CppCon

If you would like to attend CppCon 2019, see great C++ content, and meet our speakers and attendees, but conference registration doesn’t fit your budget, consider volunteering.

Ambience_and_snacks_6

We are looking for volunteers to help run the conference. We need people to:

  • help assemble registration packets and badges,
  • register attendees,
  • assist speakers with Audio/Video (AV),
  • and, in general, be on hand to make things run smoothly.

In exchange, we’ll see to it that you’ll spend at least half of your time in sessions. It would be great if you could join us for the whole week, but if you can only make it for one or two days, we can work with that. We have information on our Volunteer Page. If you would like more information, please email volunteers@cppcon.org.

Volunteer Grant Program

This program has grants to cover some or (in a few cases) all of the costs of lodging and travel for a limited number of volunteers. Grants will be awarded to applicants that can commit to volunteering for five days. Grant applications will be accepted until June 25th and judged on the basis of participation and leadership in the C++ community.

If you:

  • are active in the C++ community on-line, in your local user group, or at C++ events,
  • are actively supporting C++ on StackOverflow or GitHub,
  • have worked on an Open Source C++ project like an Open Source library, CppReference, C++VAP,
  • write reviews for Open Source libraries on Boost, Boost Incubator, or C++ Reviews,
  • or, have a blog, podcast, or YouTube channel on C++,

but have not attended CppCon because you can’t afford the travel and lodging, this is your opportunity.

For more information about the Volunteer Grant Program, read our Volunteer Page.

Casa Bonita / Hyperspace Arcade Field Trip Announced

Casa BonitaJoin us for fun and games in Denver!

The CppCon 2019 Field Trip will be to Casa Bonita and Hyperspace Arcade.

Spend a fun-filled Sunday afternoon on September 15th, with other CppCon attendees, at the world famous Casa Bonita restaurant for lunch and then free 80’s style arcade games all afternoon at the nearby Hyperspace Arcade.

Casa Bonita is the Mexican restaurant made famous by the South Park episode in which the boys declare that it’s like the Disneyland of Mexican restaurants. The restaurant features a number of different entertainments, such as cliff divers, shows, and a secret hideout.

Hyperspace Arcade features unlimited game play on over one hundred fifty machines including classics and rare titles.

If you are arriving for CppCon 2019 by Sunday morning, this is your opportunity get to know some of your fellow attendees in a fun-filled stress-free environments.

See  the CppCon 2019 Field Trip page for details.