Call for Volunteers

If you would like to a part of making CppCon an event, please join us as a volunteer.

Being entirely online this year, means the volunteer duties will be very different than previous years, but the mission to produce an event that runs smoothly for all attendees is that same.

Delivering all of our content online this year will require more training of volunteers to understand the content delivery technologies that we’ll be using.

If you want more information about volunteering, contact us at volunteers@cppcon.org.

The main volunteer detail will be between 0800 to 1500 Aurora, Colorado (Mountain) time. If you can volunteer all week, this would be excellent, yet if you only have limited time, we welcome you as well.

If you want to join a great team and be a part of history making in the C++ community, please complete the CppCon 2020 Volunteer Application Form. There will be other steps after completion, yet will contact you to assist you with setup for the conference.

Thank you

Brett Searles
Matthew Butler

Please note that registration to be a volunteer will be ending the August 31st so that there will be enough time to adequately train all volunteers.

CppCon 2020 Keynote: Empirically Measuring, and Reducing, C++’s Accidental Complexity by Herb Sutter

Tomorrow (August 5th) is the last day of Early Bird Online registration.

Keynote Speaker: Herb Sutter

Herb Sutter plenaryHerb Sutter is author of several popular C++ books and the chair of the ISO C++ committee. He is a Software Architect for Microsoft.

This talk will be the seventh in Herb’s series on Simplifying C++ and it explores the possibility of acquiring more quantifiable data that we could analyze to measure sources of C++ language complexity.

From his talk’s description:

This talk reports work to systematically catalog and measure C++’s unneeded complexity, how some current evolution proposals may address its major sources, and presents specific suggestions on what we might be able to do about it in the context of a future-evolution proposal to simplify parameter passing and provide meaningful initialization guarantees in C++.

CppCon 2020 Keynote: The Beauty and Power of “Primitive” C++ by Bjarne Stroustrup

Don’t miss out on Early Bird Online registration. Only a week remains before the deadline.

Keynote Speaker: Bjarne Stroustrup

Bjarne Stroustrup is the designer and original implementer of C++ and the author of several classic books on C++. Dr. Stroustrup is a Technical Fellow and a Managing Director in the technology division of Morgan Stanley in New York City and a Visiting Professor in Computer Science at Columbia University.

Conference speakers tend to focus on novel, clever, and advanced features of C++. In contrast, in his keynote, The Beauty and Power of “Primitive” C++, Bjarne will look at addressing relatively simple problems in relatively simple ways under severe constraints of performance, ease of use, and reliability

From his talk’s description:

This is an exploration of a design space close to the hardware and of the use of C++ in that space, rather than a standards proposal or the presentation of a mature tool chain. And, no, by “primitive”, I don’t mean “old-fashioned, C-like” code; some of the general techniques are old, but some of the code requires C++17 and much could be done better given features we are unlikely to get even in C++23.

CppCon 2020 Call for Submissions

CppCon is the annual, week-long face-to-face gathering for the entire C++ community. The conference is organized by the C++ community for the community and so we invite you to present. The conference regular program consists of five days of sixty minute sessions.

Given the current situation regarding COVID-19, we feel it is best to be totally transparent with our planning process. We are closely monitoring the news regarding restrictions on travel and large gatherings. It takes about 9-12 months of planning for each conference and given that we do not know the situation in September, we are moving forward with the hope that it will be safe to see you all in Aurora.

Have you learned something interesting about C++, maybe a new technique possible in C++14/17/20? Or perhaps you have implemented something cool related to C++, maybe a new C++ library? If so, consider sharing it with other C++ enthusiasts by giving a regular program talk at CppCon 2020.

The submissions deadline is June 5th with decisions sent by July 27th.

We’ve made a format change to better serve the needs of our community. In addition to the dedicated track that we introduced last year (the Back to Basics Track), we’ve created another dedicated track (the Embedded Track).

For topic ideas, possible formats, submission instructions and valuable advice on how to make the best possible submission, see the Submissions page.

Note: Calls for Lightning Talks and Open Content sessions will be made this summer. The deadline for these is the conference itself.

#include<C++> Sponsorships

#include<C++> is accepting applications for sponsorship to CppCon 2019.

Sponsorships will cover registration, travel, accommodation, and both the Meet the Speakers Banquet and the #include<C++> Celebration Dinner.

Applications are open through August 16th, to any candidate from an under-represented background with regard to the usual CppCon attendees.

The sponsorships are crowdfunded through a GoFundMe campaign that has not quite yet reached its funding goal. Please consider donating to show your support for this sponsorship opportunity.

[Sponsorship Application Form]

[GoFundMe campaign]

 

Early Bird Registration Ends Monday

No matter when you register for CppCon 2019, you be able to :

  • Meet with
    • over a thousand other professional C++ engineers, including
      • book, blog, and library authors,
      • standards committee members,
      • compiler and other tool implementers, and
      • teachers and trainers
    • scores of the best presenters in the industry, and
    • exhibitors from all over the world
  • Attend
    • five days of seven or eight tracks of peer-reviewed presentations,
    • daily plenary talks from recognized industry leaders (see below),
    • multiple lightning talk sessions,
    • expert panels and special sessions,
    • poster presentations, and
    • social events.

But if you do it by this Monday, you save enough money to treat yourself and a friend to the conference Meet the Speakers banquet.

To help you decide, we are announcing our line up of plenary speakers:

AndreiAlexandrescu

Andrei Alexandrescu

Andrei’s talk will be a deep dive on variants of classic sorting algorithms. You might think that sorting has been studied to death and is a solved problem. But Andrei thinks there is more learn. Along the way he’ll share many wondrous surprises and teach us how to cope with the puzzling behavior of modern complex architectures.

Ben Smith

Ben will use a top-down approach to show how WebAssembly can solve a real-world problem.

His challenge is to build a Compiler Explorer-like tool that doesn’t require a server. He will show how to compile C++ code in the browser and run the resulting executable sandboxed in the browser.

Ben Smith
Bjarne Stroustrup

Bjarne Stroustrup

C++ is turning forty. In a talk that both looks back and looks forward, Bjarne will ask the question, What is C++?

He will answer by looking at C++20, as a modern language, not treating it as a layer cake of features, but as integrated whole discussing how classes, templates, lambdas, and the other components of the language fit together.

Herb Sutter

Herb is going to discuss exceptions and RTTI, the only two features in C++ that violate the the zero-overhead principle. These features have divided our community. This talk is about ongoing long-term efforts to try to unify the community, not by replacing exceptions and RTTI, but by doubling down: fully embracing exceptions and RTTI, and improving them so they can be zero-overhead too.

Herb Sutter
Sean Parent

Sean Parent

Computer scientists are bad at relationships. Nearly every program crash is rooted in a mismanaged relationship, yet we spend most of our time discussing types and functions and not the relationships connecting them together. Sean’s talk looks at common ways data and code are connected in an application, how those relationships are typically represented, and the problems caused by the use, and misuse of these paradigms.

These five speakers will be joined by over one hundred of the best presenters in the industry as well as over a thousand top C++ programmers that want to engage with you, sharing their insight and experience. Do not miss the chance to join them all in Aurora this September.

Don’t delay, register today.

Call for Proposals for CppCon 2019 Classes

The conference is asking for instructors to submit proposals for pre- and post-conferences classes to be taught in conjunction with next September’s CppCon 2019.

If you are interested in teaching such a class, please contact us at info@cppcon.org and we’ll send you an instructors’ prospectus and address any questions that you might have. The deadline for submitting proposals is December 21st, 2018.

Early Bird Registration Ends this Weekend

No matter when you register for CppCon 2018, you be able to :

  • Meet with
    • over a thousand other professional C++ engineers, including
      • book, blog, and library authors,
      • standards committee members,
      • compiler and other tool implementers, and
      • teachers and trainers
    • scores of the best presenters in the industry, and
    • exhibitors from all over the world
  • Attend
    • five days of six or seven tracks of peer-reviewed presentations,
    • daily plenary talks from recognized industry leaders,
    • multiple lightning talk sessions,
    • expert panels and special sessions,
    • poster presentations, and
    • social events.

But if you do it by this weekend, you save more than enough money to treat yourself to the Meet the Speakers Dinner.

To help you decide, here, for the first time, is this year’s promo video:

If you recognize someone you know, let them know that you’ll see them in September.

CppCon 2018 Plenary: Patterns and Techniques Used in the Houdini 3D Graphics Application by Mark Elendt

Early Bird registration is almost at an end. Only three days (one US business days) remain before the deadline.

Plenary Speaker: Mark Elendt

Mark ElendtAcademy award-winner, Mark Elendt will be giving his first CppCon talk on Patterns and Techniques Used in the Houdini 3D Graphics Application.

Mark has been working at SideFX, the creators of Houdini for over 25 years and it was in recognition of this work and the value of Houdini to the motion picture industry that Mark and SideFX Software were given a Scientific and Technical Academy Award of Merit earlier this year.

From his talk’s description:

Not only has Houdini been used in all of the Visual Effects Academy Award winning films of the past 10 years, but it has also been used for television shows like Game of Thrones and Stranger Things as well as content creation for many AAA video games, and even for scientific visualization. 

Houdini artists are tasked with creating amazing, never before seen visual effects. They constantly push both performance and scale in the software. Since the early 1990’s Houdini’s C++ architecture has provided a flexible platform that has enabled artists from around the world to 
create their vision. 

Mark will discuss some of the patterns and approaches that have been used in Houdini to meet the demands of production, from the early days of dealing with c-front to embracing modern features provided by modern C++. 

CppCon 2018 Keynote: Simplicity: Not Just for Beginners by Kate Gregory

Don’t miss out on Early Bird registration. Only five days (two US business days) remain before the deadline.

Keynote Speaker: Kate Gregory

Kate GregoryKate Gregory is an author, sought-after conference speaker, trainer, Microsoft Regional Director, and partner at Gregory Consulting. She is also a frequent and popular speaker at CppCon and this year she be giving her first CppCon keynote address.

In her keynote, Simplicity: Not Just for Beginners, she will address the question, Why do so many people say that simple code is better code, but so few put it into practice?

From her talk’s description:

In this talk I’ll spend a little time on why simpler is better, and why we resist simplicity. Then I’ll provide some specific approaches that are likely to make your code simpler, and discuss what you need to know and do in order to consistently write simpler code and reap the benefits of that simplicity.