Call for Class Proposals

The conference is asking for instructors to submit proposals for classes to be taught in conjunction with next September’s CppCon 2017.

If you are interested in teaching such a class, please contact us at and we’ll send you an instructors’ prospectus and address any questions that you might have. The deadline for submitting proposals is November 18th, 2016.

All CppCon 2016 Videos Are Up!

We set an attendance record again this year, but the number of C++ programmers that can’t make it will always exceed the number that can. That is why we have committed to producing high quality recordings of the CppCon regular program and distributing them as widely as possible.

To achieve this, we work with Bash Films ( Their commitment to us is to have all our videos edited and uploaded to the CppCon YouTube channel within one month of the end of the conference.

I wanted to share some stats with you on Bash Films’ work for this year:

  • 7653 minutes of video recordedjackiekay
  • 7513 minutes of slides recorded
  • 111 presentations recorded
  • 31 lightning talks recorded
  • 47 different SSD cards used
  • 36 TB of storage used
  • 8 camera operators onsite
  • 0 presentations lost or damaged

This works out to about two sessions a week for every week between now and the 2017 conference.

There is one more stat:

  • 2 weeks to get all the videos edited and uploaded!

That’s correct, Mark Bashian’s team has completed all the videos in two weeks! They over-delivered on their one month commitment by over two weeks so that attendees could catch all the sessions that they missed as soon as possible.

The only thing left for the team to do is to send the videos (on hard drive) to Channel 9, because we continue to make all our content available on both YouTube and Channel 9.


Announcing CppCon 2017 Dates and Location

Save the date for the week of September 24th next year in Bellevue, Washington. Building on the success of this year’s pre-conference classes, we will be offering two-day classes on September 23rd and 24th. Registration and reception will be on the 24th and sessions will be the 25th though the 29th.

In the meantime, look for slides and source code for your favorite CppCon 2016 sessions at our presentation material repository. You can also watch CppCon 2016 session videos on YouTube and Channel 9. Some of them are already available on the CppCon YouTube channel.


I want to say thanks very much to all the hundreds of people that made CppCon 2016 possible and I look forward to seeing you in Bellevue next September.

CppCon 2016 Call for Lightning Talks

Lightning talks are fast paced, short presentations often sprinkled with humor and intrigue. The popular 5-minute talks present topics that are interesting to C++ programmers and are open to speakers at all experience levels.

If you’ve never seen one before checkout some of our previous lightning talks on our YouTube channel. They cover a single topic, start with the good stuff, and end making a point. Anyone can do one, but be sure to practice because 5 minutes goes by incredibly fast. If there’s one technique you wish everyone knew, one little known fact that should be well known, one tool that makes your life easier every day, or a collection of little things that you can fit into 5 minutes, you can propose a lighting talk, and you should.

Anyone can submit a talk, you don’t need to be a conference speaker (or even a registered attendee). We are looking for talks from experienced speakers, but also new speakers and students. To submit a talk, just email and tell us what you want to talk about and a little bit about yourself (one sentence is fine). Even if you don’t plan to submit, plan to attend, it’s sure to be fun!

CppCon 2016 Call for Open Content

Just like last year, CppCon will offer Open Content sessions in the early morning, over lunch, and in the evening.


Open Content is just that, open! Attendees and regular program speakers alike can propose sessions on anything that interests them. These might feature a single facilitator leading a room through an exercise, activity or demo, a panel of 3-5 people taking questions from the room, a “hackathon” on a specific project, or an open conversation among the whole room. The projector is available for slides or public note taking.

Open Content is designed for flexibility so that a “Birds of a Feather” talk may be proposed even after the conference has begun. A speaker who gets a lot of post-talk questions may agree to host a Q&A session in the Open Content time. An attendee inspired by a session may host a session to explore a topic further or start on a group implementation of something.

To propose a session, simply email and tell us the title, description, and speaker(s)/moderators(s). If you have time constraints such as “after a specific session” or “not on the same day as a specific session” let us know in the email.

These sessions will be open in another way too – Open Content does not require conference registration. That’s right, everyone who is in the area is welcome to come and join us for all the early morning/evening/lunch sessions, including proposing or leading a session. This is part of our goal to be an inclusive conference for the entire C++ community.

For now, please email your submissions as soon as you can so that our planning work can get underway. See you in Bellevue!


Call for Volunteers

If you would like to attend CppCon 2016, see great C++ content, and meet our speakers and attendees, but a week’s registration doesn’t fit your time or money budget, consider volunteering.


We are looking for volunteers to help run the conference. We need people to help assemble registration packets and badges, register attendees, assist speakers with Audio/Video, and in general be on hand to make things run smoothly. In exchange, we’ll see to it that you’ll spend at least half of your time in sessions. It would be great if you could join us for the whole week, but if you can only make it for one or two days, we can work with that. We have information on our Volunteer Page. If you are interested or would like more information, please email

David Schwartz Keynote and Jason Turner Plenary

David Schwartz, the Chief Cryptographer of the Ripple distributed payment system, will be giving a keynote this year at CppCon! David, also known as “JoelKatz”, is a respected voice in the crypto-currency community. Prior to working on Ripple, David developed secure messaging and cloud storage software for government and military applications. He’ll talk about Developing Blockchain Software:

This talk will explain what public blockchain systems like Bitcoin and Ripple are, the unique challenges of developing software for them, and how C++ helps to meet these challenges.

Security issues are paramount. Blockchain systems are open source, have large attack surfaces, and can cause significant financial damage
if they have exploitable defects. Performance and scalability are also major concerns.

C++ provides a unique balance that helps meet these challenges. The language’s design makes it possible to catch bugs at compile time, write modular code that can be tested, develop flexible data structures and manage resources. Yet, where performance is critical, it does not obscure what your code is making the computer actually do.

The primary purpose of the talk is to explain what blockchains are, increase understanding of the unusual challenges developers of blockchain software experience, and to demonstrate why C++ is a good choice to address them.

We’ll also have a plenary talk by Jason Turner! Jason Turner is an independent contractor with 16 years of development experience. For the past 6 years he’s been specializing in cross platform development, scripting of C++ libraries, and automated testing and code quality analysis. He’s the co-creator and maintainer of the embedded scripting language for C++, ChaiScript, and author and curator of the forkable coding standards document. He’s also one of the co-hosts of the CppCast pod cast. We’re all excited about Jason’s plenary, Rich Code For Tiny Machines: A Simple Commodore 64 Game In C++17:

The Commodore 64 was released in 1982 and is the best selling computer model of all time. At 34 years old, even the most simple embedded processor today outperforms it. Join me on an exploration of how C++17 techniques can be utilized to write expressive, high performance, high level code for simple computers. Together we will create a game for this aging system.

You’ll leave the talk with a better understanding of what your compiler is capable of and be able to apply these ideas to create better code on modern systems

There’s still time to register for CppCon 2016! Come join us in September!

— Bryce Adelstein Lelbach

Program Published, Bjarne Stroustrup Keynote and T-Shirt Design Contest

Bjarne StroustrupThe full program for CppCon 2016 has been published! This year we have over 100 regular sessions, in addition to panels, lightning talks and some awesome keynote and plenary speakers. We’ll have six concurrent tracks running for most of the conference.

Speaking of keynotes, it’s our pleasure to announce that Bjarne Stroustrup, the creator of C++, will be returning to CppCon to give the opening keynote, The Evolution of C++: Past, Present, and Future:

This is a philosophical talk. It deals with ideals, aims, and ways of approximating those. It deals with practical constraints and risks. It gives short examples. It presents a perspective of what drives the evolution of C++. What is C++ and what it must become over the next years for its success to continue? This involves both social and technical points. Towards the end, I discuss the direction of C++ future evolution, give some opinions, point to urgently needed new features, and discuss how to manage until they are part of the standard.

We also have a special treat for swag-loving attendees – we’ll be selecting the CppCon 2016 t-shirt design via an open contest. The t-shirts are included with Early Bird registration, and are also available as a separate purchase when registering online.

— Bryce Adelstein Lelbach

Program Preview: Concurrency, Modules and Finance

Speaking for the first time in the US, Anthony Williams, one of the original authors of Boost.Thread and the author of C++ Concurrency in Action will be joining us this year at CppCon! His talk, The Continuing Future of Concurrency in C++, will provide overview of the additions to the standard C++ concurrency libraries in the Technical Specifications for Concurrency and Parallelism and the C++14 and C++17 standards. These additions include: continuations, latches, barriers, atomic smart pointers, shared ownership mutexes, executors, concurrent queues, distributed counters, coroutines, parallel algorithms and more.

Hans Boehm, the chair of the C++ standards committee’s concurrency and parallelism study group (SG1), will also be speaking at CppCon this year. Hans may be best known for his work on the Boehm garbage collector, but he’s also one of the chief architects of the C++ memory model. Hans will be talking about Using Weakly Ordered Atomics Correctly.

We have plenty more content on concurrency in this year’s program, including:

Richard Smith, the project editor for the C++ standards committee and the code owner for the Clang project will be at CppCon 2016. In his talk, There and Back Again: An Incremental C++ Modules Design, Richard will share the Clang community’s experience with modules and discuss the direction of modules standardization efforts.

We have a few other talks on modules:

Finally, some talks of interest to the financial industry:

It’s not too late to register for CppCon 2016! Come join us in September!

— Bryce Adelstein Lelbach

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Dan Saks Keynote and More Program Previews (Embedded, Coroutines and Accelerators)

Dan Saks

I’m very pleased to announce that Dan Saks will be one of our keynotes this year! Dan is one of the world’s leading experts on the C and C++ programming languages and their use in developing embedded systems.

He is the president of Saks & Associates, which offers training and consulting in C, C++ and embedded programming. Dan has previously served as secretary of the ANSI and ISO C++ Standards committees and as a member of the ANSI C Standards committee.

Dan used to write the “Programming Pointers” column for He has also written for numerous publications including The C/C++ Users Journal, The C++ Report, The Journal of C Language Translation, Software Development, Embedded Systems Design and Dr. Dobb’s Journal. With Thomas Plum, he wrote C++ Programming Guidelines, which won a 1992 Computer Language Magazine Productivity Award. He has presented at conferences such as Software Development and Embedded Systems. More recently, he contributed to the CERT Secure C Coding Standard and the CERT Secure C++ Coding Standard.

Dan’s keynote, extern “C”: Talking to C Programmers About C++, will be about migrating C code (and C programmers) to modern C++:

Most of us have heard this story. We’ve even told it ourselves…

C++ is nearly all of C, plus a whole lot more. Migrating code from C to C++ is pretty easy. Moreover, the migration itself can yield immediate benefits by exposing questionable type conversions that can be sources of latent bugs. After migration, the code performs as well in C++ as in the original C. And now that it’s C++, you have ready access to a wealth of advanced features you can (but don’t have to) use to implement enhancements.

Who wouldn’t want that? Legions of C programmers, apparently.

Despite the success of C++ in numerous application domains, C remains considerably more popular, especially in embedded, automotive, and aerospace applications. In many cases, projects resist C++ because their managers think the risks outweigh the benefits. In other cases, the resistance comes from programmers who persist in believing bad things about C++, even when those things aren’t true.

What can the C++ community do to overcome this resistance? Drawing on lessons from cognitive science, linguistics and psychology, and (of course) computer science, this talk offers suggestions about how to make the case for C++ more persuasive to C programmers.

We’ve got some program previews from three tracks today:

Here’s some of our content on embedded programming:

We’ve also got a lot of great talks about the upcoming Coroutines TS:

And finally, some talks about accelerator and GPU programming:

Come join us at CppCon in Bellevue this September – registration is still open!

— Bryce Adelstein Lelbach

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