CppCon 2014 is done

Some of the announcements made at the close of the conference include the fact that conference tee shirts are now available on our on-line store, presentation notes will be available on git hub, and our dates for next year will be September 20 – 25, 2015.

Before looking to next year and CppCon 2015, I’d like to thank all the people that made CppCon 2014 such a big success. First I’d like to thank the sponsors whose support is critical to the existence of the conference. I’d also like to thank all the presenters whose content made the conference what it is; the keynotes, the regular program presenters, the panelists and moderators, the Open Content presenters, and the Lightning Talk presenters. These presenters are busy, smart people, but they’ve taken the time to create presentations that excited attendees from all over the world.

I’ve a very big thanks for the conference staff who did so many things in so many ways to make this week-long experience valuable for our almost six hundred attendees.

Finally, and most importantly, I want to thank the attendees. They are the real value and attraction of this conference.

I can’t wait to see you all again next year.

Jon

Call for Lightning Talks, Take 2

As part of getting ready to come to CppCon 2014, please consider presenting a Lightning Talk. All attendees (as well as anyone nearby who is taking advantage of the free evening content without registering) are eligible to present a 5 or 15 minute session on Tuesday evening. While the first Call for Lightning Talks has more details on what we’re looking for, we’re open to talks from new speakers, from experienced speakers, from those who work mainly in another language and are visiting C++, from those who work in C++ all the time – everyone! If there’s one tool you just love using, one technique or best practice you’d like to share with others, or one thing you think is pretty darn funny, please see if you can make it into a 5 or 15 minute talk and share it Tuesday evening. There will be a projector and there will be an audience so why not “give it a go” and see what happens?

We’ll be selecting the 8 sessions on Monday, Day 1 of the conference. Just email open-content@cppcon.org and tell us what you want to talk about, what length you need and a little bit about yourself – one sentence is fine. Your topic should be relevant to CppCon attendees but doesn’t need to be about C++ – we’d love to see “Why C++ developers should also know [language]” for example. Even if you don’t plan to submit, plan to attend, it’s sure to be fun!

Evening Panel Topics Confirmed

We have now confirmed details for the Monday, Wednesday, and Friday panels:

Monday 8:30pm: “Meet the Authors
Moderator: Chandler Carruth
Panelists: Ade Miller, Alex Allain, Kate Gregory, Pablo Halpern, Scott Meyers, Peter Sommerlad, Herb Sutter

Come to this panel to put your questions to many of the world’s top C++ published authors, and hear them discuss what they think is most important about C++ today. The CppCon 2014 program includes many of the world’s top C++ published authors, so we’re taking advantage of their being in town to bring them together in our opening panel for a discussion and Q&A session.

Wednesday 8:30pm: “Grill the Committee
Moderator: Jon Kalb
Panelists: Chandler Carruth, Nevin Liber, Alisdair Meredith, Herb Sutter, Michael Wong

What would you like to know about how the C++ Standard happens? The panel is made up of members of the C++ Standards Committee and the audience asks what’s on their mind.

Friday 2pm: “Paying for Lunch: C++ in the ManyCore Age
Moderator: Herb Sutter
Panelists: Jared Hoberock, Artur Laksberg, Ade Miller, Gor Nishanov, Michael Wong, Pablo Halpern

If you’re serious about efficient computation, from efficient battery-sipping apps on mobile devices to efficient use of compute cloud nodes, you need to know how to exploit the massive parallelism already available in all of today’s mainstream devices. Even small tablets and smartphones already contain multiple CPU/GPU cores and vector units. CppCon 2014 includes lots of talks about implementing such parallelism in C++ using existing products and techniques, and the standardization committee is actively working on standardizing several C++ extensions for concurrency and parallelism, including resumable functions, a Parallel STL, and transactional memory support. In this panel, we bring together several experts, including the primary authors of these products and standard specifications – in other words the who’s-who driving C++ parallelism forward – to discuss this topic across all devices and form factors, large and small.

Free Friday, Final Plenary Session

We previously announced that CppCon 2014 evening content (Mon-Thu 8:30pm onward) and early morning breakfast sessions (Tue-Fri 8:00-8:45) do not require registration. In addition, this year, we are making the whole of Friday free as well. If you’re in the Seattle area, you’ll want to swing by and enjoy the Friday end-note plenary session and the final panel with us. And the final plenary session will be:

Herb Sutter: “Back to the Basics! Essentials of Modern C++ Style

This talk revisits basic questions, such as how to declare and initialize a variable, how to pass a value to a function, how to write a simple loop, and how to use smart pointers, in the light of experience with C++11 and the latest C++14 refinements. This involves examining auto, rvalue references, range-for loops, uniform initialization, lambda expressions, unique_ptr and shared_ptr, and more.

CppCon 2014 Volunteers Wanted

If you would like to attend CppCon 2014, see great C++ content, and meet our speakers and attendees, but a week’s registration doesn’t fit your time or money budget, consider volunteering.

We are looking for volunteers to help run the conference. We need people to help assemble registration packets and badges, register attendees, assist speakers with Audio/Video, and in general be on hand to make things run smoothly. In exchange, we’ll see to it that you’ll spend at least half of your time in sessions. It would be great if you could join us for the whole week, but if you can only make it for one or two days, we can work with that. This is a particularly great opportunity for local students with an interest in C++. If you are interested or would like more information, please email volunteers@cppcon.org.

CppCon 2014 Call for Lightning Talks

On Tuesday, the evening program will include Lightning Talks – 4 talks of 15 minutes and 4 talks of 5 minutes. Expect fast paced fun with talks that are funny or intriguing from speakers at all experience levels.

If you’ve never seen a lighting talk before, check out this example (it’s just 4 and a half minutes long and funnier if you know Ruby or JavaScript) or search you tube for “lightning talk” to see a variety of examples. They cover a single topic and they start with the good stuff and make a point. Anyone can do one, but be sure to practice because 5 minutes goes by incredibly fast and 15 minutes isn’t much easier. If there’s one technique you wish everyone knew, one little known fact that should be well known, one tool that makes your life easier every day, or a collection of little things that you can fit into 5 or 15 minutes, you can propose a lighting talk, and you should.

We’ll be selecting the 8 sessions on Monday, Day 1 of the conference, from submissions we receive before and during the conference. Just email open-content@cppcon.org and tell us what you want to talk about, what length you need and a little bit about yourself. Even if you don’t plan to submit, plan to attend, it’s sure to be fun!

CppCon 2014 Open Content

Each evening the conference activities will break for dinner from 5:45 to 8:30, giving you time to head out and enjoy a meal with fellow attendees. But after eating, don’t head back for a boring night in your hotel room – come back to the venue for another 90 minutes of learning and networking!

Monday through Thursday from 8:30 pm to 10 pm is the evening program. Looser and less structured than the daytime program, it’s designed to get you engaged and give you opportunities that traditional sessions can’t offer. In our six rooms, one will hold a single “conference planned” session that spans the full 90 minutes, and the other five will hold open content, two 45-minute sessions per room. There will also be open content in all 6 rooms from 8:00am to 8:45 Tuesday through Friday.

The “conference planned” sessions are Meet the Authors Monday, Lightning Talks Tuesday, Grill the Committee Wednesday and Conference Planning Thursday. More details on each of these will be coming shortly.

Open content is just that, open! Attendees and speakers alike can propose sessions on anything that interests them. These might be a single facilitator leading a room through an exercise, activity or demo, a panel of 3-5 people taking questions from the room and answering them, a “hackathon” on a specific project, or an open conversation among the whole room. The projector is available (possibly to take collaborative notes, possibly to display content related to the exercise; typical slide presentations are not the best fit for open content sessions.)

Many of these “Birds of a Feather” talks will be proposed on site as the conference progresses. A speaker who gets a lot of post-talk questions may agree to host a Q&A session in the open content time. An attendee inspired by a session may host a session to explore a topic further or start on a group implementation of something. Some can be proposed in advance and with 64 slots to fill, our job will be easier if many of them are. To propose a session, simply email open-content@cppcon.org and tell us who you are and what you want a session about. If you have time constraints such as “after a specific session” or “not on the same day as a specific session” let us know in the email. (For example, someone who will be grilled at Grill The Committee Wednesday can’t do an open session Wednesday evening.)

These sessions will be open in another way too – evening content does not require conference registration. That’s right, everyone who is in the area is welcome to come and join us for all the evening sessions, including to propose or lead a session. This is part of our goal to be an inclusive conference for the entire C++ community.

Attendees will be able to express their interest in these sessions in advance, enabling us to schedule them and to select the most popular if we have more submissions than slots. More details on that will follow soon. For now, please email your submissions as soon as you can so that our planning work can get underway. See you in Bellevue!

Third Keynote

We have finalized the third keynote for CppCon 2014:

Mike Acton

Mike Acton: “Data-Oriented Design and C++

The transformation of data is the only purpose of any program. Common approaches in C++ which are antithetical to this goal will be presented in the context of a performance-critical domain (console game development). Additionally, limitations inherent in any C++ compiler and how that affects the practical use of the language when transforming that data will be demonstrated.

Speaker’s bio: Mike Acton is Engine Director at Insomniac Games. When he’s not searching for new ways to optimize Insomniac’s engine, he dreams up new ways to help the development community. Mike can often be found extolling the virtues of understanding the data and hardware first along with programming for performance.